Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Nature’

Solitude

Solitude

RancheriaCoibaBirdtrip2009March 206
Roar

Roar

Star

Star

Beauty has its own heavenly language, loftier than the voices of tongues and lips. It is a timeless language, common to all humanity, a calm lake that attracts the singing rivulets to its depth and makes them silent. Only our spirits can understand beauty, or live and grow with it. It puzzles our minds; we are unable to describe it in words; it is a sensation that our eyes cannot see, derived from both the one who observes and the one who is looked upon. Real beauty is a ray which emanates from the holy of holies of the spirit, and illuminates the body, as life comes from the depths of the earth and gives color and scent to a flower.

Kahlil Gibran
Broken Wings

Beauty in the palm of my hand

Beauty in the palm of my hand

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Tracking

Tracking

I spent five days at the UNESCO world heritage site, Coiba Island National Park assisting with bird tracking research. The island is 46 miles offshore encompassing 150 miles of unspoiled beaches. It is the largest island in Central America, about the size of Barbados. Coiba island is also one of the last places in Central America where the Scarlet Macaw (Ara Macao) can be found in the wild and in large numbers. The sight of a flock of Macaws flying overhead was humbling, I was stunned, paralyzed and unfortunately was unable to fish out my camera fast enough. The island has three endemic subspecies, the Coiba Mantled Howler monkey (Alouatta Coibensis), the Coiba Agouti (Dasyprocta Coibae), a short tailed, plant eating large rodent, the size of a domestic cat. Finally, a bird species I helped the ornithologists to track, the Coiba SpineTail (Cranioleuca Dissita).

Greeting the morning sun from Coiba Island

Greeting the morning sun from Coiba Island

We woke up every morning at 5AM groggily fixing snacks and bottling cold water for our trip and arrived onshore  to meet a boat that took us to a remote area Coiba where we spent about 5 hours hiking through dense jungle along a marked transect.

Vine Portal

Vine Portal

The path was hacked with a machete through the vegetation, an almost impenetrable tangle of vines and bushes and marked with colored markers tied to small trees or branches. We walked steadily through the jungle, grabbing onto vines for hand holds, using roots, rocks, and small trees to steady us as we meandered up and down inclines following the Spinetail and Ruddybacked dove calls and searching for nests.

Knots

Knots

The ground was packed with leaves and rotting foliage in certain areas, careful not to slip, each step measured for reliability. It was intense, and I loved it. With each deep breath, I filled my lungs with a variety of smells, sweet and fragrant from the newly blossoming flowers, since the rains began just a day or two ago.

Hungry Honeybee

Hungry Honeybee

Yet, as the day progressed the humidity and heat rose so our clothes were drenched,we sweat as much as the water we drank. Invigorated as we neared the end of the transect we sat in a clear patch to eat a snack, comparing our observations.

I learned so much on this journey, met some brilliant ornithologists and feel closer to the natural world around me.

Read Full Post »

diamonds

diamond

Read Full Post »

Memories are revered guests in the temple of my mind and like a welcoming host, I entertain them and listen to their stories. Each visit I decipher a different detail, recollect missed quips of conversation, bask in certain emotions and colors they evoke. Sometimes they require a nightcap, other times they only stay for tea. I try to invite positive ones and they may bring presents of longing perchance regret, I try not to keep the regrets. Here, on the island, where the hustle and bustle of the outside world is missing, I have space for centered thoughts, for deep breathing, and also for appreciation of the past, to recognize and acknowledge what I did not notice before.

Joy

During my daily hikes I always try to find an idyllic spot to sit, either by the ocean or in the dense forest surrounded by non human inhabitants. I watch the daily comings and goings of insects and birds, I cannot fool the other mammals, like the skittish Agouti or called Nieke by the local Panamanians. Each source of life taking their turns to inspect me. A variety of Leaf-cutter ant scouts foraging for tidbits, a black species of stingless Bees or tiny yellow Wasps hover around deciding if I offer nectar, Buho butterflies whisk by and I am surprised to find that I am the only one sitting still and quiet. Every other living organism is going about their business, concerned about living or being eaten this day.

Read Full Post »

Oropendula nests

Oropendula nests

Forest-Collared Falocn outside the window

Forest-Collared Falcon

Read Full Post »

RAYSin the Sun...

RAYSin the Sun...

More gushings...

More gushings...

Read Full Post »

Intent

Intent

There are no poisonous snakes on the island, or so I believe. None have been identified, yet, even by the scientists that have tried to record the diversity of animal life in this unusual area. There are boas and pythons but not too large. Beautiful blazing colors define the jungle from the canopy above to the muted colors of the ground below. I saw a small pseudo-coral snake, about width of my pinkie finger the other day, my first snake sighting. I tried to capture it. I am not afraid of snakes, I am fascinated by them. When I was a child and living with my grandparents in India, my grandfather, Dada, taught me how to pick up snakes and scorpions. We practiced on the rat snakes he found in the sugar cane fields on our farm. I loved it. Holding something wild and alive, powerful and so very smooth, almost always cool to touch. They can sense the energy around them. He also told me to be calm when trying to pick them up. Calm and confident, always have your strategy beforehand. That lesson came in very handy in the later years, when I finally learned to put strategy into action in my personal life.

I arrived here two years ago on a small lancha, boat. We rode for two hours from port, gliding above crystal waters, a few mantas jumping out of the sea. Approaching the island, the overgrown vegetation seemed to burst out from the cliffs, brilliant greens framed by various shades of beige and brown rocks. Slowly, we approached an azure blue protected cove, the service marina, my jaw agape. I placed one foot onto the shore, water lapping at my ankle and I immediately thought, “God, if I could only live here.” Intent, even if it was unintentional.

Two years later,now, I am a different person, but inherently the same. Redefined and basically renovated in order to survive, post marriage, post medical career, post, post and finally I want my environment to shape me. I am thrilled. Get over self, my expectations, and just be.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »